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Scotland’s American Revolution

Scotland’s American Revolution

By Mark Connolly

Scotland’s American Revolution began in the Fall of 1759. Benjamin Franklin – then Colonial Envoy to Great Britain for Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Georgia – made his first reported trip north to the Scottish capital, Edinburgh. He spent the next two months enjoying good friends and good company in the taverns and meeting houses of a city that played no small part in the new political, social and economic ideas that would dominate the American Revolution.  

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What kind of Scottish American are you? Highlander or Lowlander? East or West Coaster? Midwest Jock, Redneck or Hillbilly?

What kind of Scottish American are you? Highlander or Lowlander? East or West Coaster? Midwest Jock, Redneck or Hillbilly?

By Mark Connolly

For the descendants of Scottish Americans it can be difficult to identify exact origins because there are three primary groups of Scots in America’s formative years who spread far and wide.

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English Canadians: From the periphery to confederation

English Canadians: From the periphery to confederation

English Canadians were very much outsiders when they arrived not long after the French in the early 1600s. An Italian paid by King Henry VII of England did make the first European contact since the Vikings in the 11th century but the age of imperial expansion was well underway by the time the English made any impact. Portugal, Spain and France were miles ahead in the competitive resource grab and only a remarkable series of events made the cultures of Britain and Ireland replace the dominance of the French.

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